Still Missing Pieces: Sandy and The Shore, A Year On…

Hurricane Damage Sandy

Damage wrought by Sandy. Photo by Diane Hoffman

Our first stop is Bay Head. To shore ourselves up for the journey (the pun is entirely unintentional).

Before we had touched down in Newark for our annual summer sojourn to reconnect with the homeland, my cousin Samm — who lives in Ocean County, in the middle of where Sandy made landfall last year — and I had notionally talked about taking a drive down “The Barrier Island Route,” that stretch of road that traverses at least half of the narrow twenty mile long Barnegat Barrier Peninsula separating the bay from the Atlantic Ocean. Wikipedia calls it a “summer colony.” As a child, I only ever referred to it as Normandy Beach (one of the communities along the coastal line of the island) or more often, “Nana’s house.”

It felt like something I should do, something meaningful. I felt like I had lived a lot of important childhood moments there, a lot of growing up, a lot of sandcastle building, swinging, tag playing with waves, sitting by my Nana’s side for beach card games (they use elastic bands to make the cards stay in place. trust me. it works), secret passage exploring and boogie-boarding, ice-cream cone eating and crabbing, running against the wind of the sea with carefree, reckless abandon. I had not seen this place around which so many innocent and misty eyed memories were centered since the previous summer, before it had been ravaged by Superstorm Sandy.

Normandy Beach after Sandy

Normandy Beach, the town where my grandmother used to live. Photo by Diane Hoffman

It felt like something  that would illuminate for me this cloudy shroud of mystery that obscured a significant part of the world for me, that I’d only seen in news reports or in photo albums on Facebook by those determined that people should see and know. Having not been there and having felt powerless and remote, I wanted to hear the echoes of the past, as close to when and where they happened as possible. I suppose I wanted things to have changed as little as possible. I wanted the stories of men and women who worked for emergency services, army engineers, firefighters, paramedics who had risked their lives, people whose homes had been literally shaken to the ground and whose lives and community has been rent into shreds; I think I wanted those stories to be the exception and perhaps even a slight exaggeration.

I suppose I wanted some sense of closure.

Normandy Beach Superstorm Sandy

Infinite Nature. Photo by Diane Hoffman

But now that it came to it, now that we were in Mueller’s Bakery in Bay Head, about to embark on our journey, I must confess, I’m feeling a little nervous. Unsure of what lies ahead, I see that Mueller’s has put up photos, one of the town of Bay Head, completely submerged. So. No exaggeration. No sensationalism in the disaster movie-like footage from Sandy. This was real.

photo-2

Houses. In the street. Photo by Diane Hoffman

Nothing prepares me for the island though. We pass plot after plot, some with gaping holes, some half-way in the process of reconstruction, some with warning tape stretching round them, some with barely skeletal foundations and a “for sale” sign added with bitter irony. A stunning landscape in which pieces have fallen away, as from a jigsaw, leaving gaping holes in my memory and the horizon. Where once it felt thriving and joyful, as we pass Mantoloking and Chadwick, finally slowing in Normandy Beach, things seem desolate and abandoned. We come to a stop on fifth avenue, a minute away from the bay where a swingset has succumbed to being tossed forever into the depths and the roads have recently been flooded. The place seems strangely calm. Houses seemed oddly together. Things have been reconstructed. Just. We sit with the engine idling in front of what used to be my grandmother’s house,  sold years ago, and yet, still the psychological space of all those precious moments, still the heart of this area for me. My cousin and I pass commentary here and there on little differences, adjustments the current owners have made. The car settles into reflective silence. I turn to my son, sitting in the back and say, “Do you see that? That’s the house where your great-grandmother used to live.”

I think he tries to accept this knowledge with gravity before sighing heavily and saying, “Can we go to a park now?”

I laugh. We laugh. Gladly. If Jersey is reconstructing, it is to preserve that childlike innocence and joy of life, and to create space for new memories, new precious moments, new joys. In our Jerseyan “Spirit of the Blitz”, our steely eyed determination to rebuild, we rebuild so that our children can once again associate the shore with the kind of memories that make us treasure it so dearly in our hearts.

The Famed. The Crumbcake. Mueller's. From Fema's website.

The Famed. The Crumbcake. Mueller’s. From Fema’s website.

————————————-

There are still many suffering the after effects of reconstruction or the inability to make efforts towards it. I rounded up a few stories about it here, an invitation here, and something here about the frustration individuals still feel in rebuilding, including the lovely and generous lady who provided the photographs for this post, Diane Hoffman, my grandmother’s neighbour for all those years when I was a slip of a youth, enjoying the seaside, and who only this week, a year after their storm savaged house blew away, are getting occupancy certificates.

And a special thank you to my cousin Samm, who I have mentioned before in connection with helping the recovery effort through Backpacks for Brick, for putting the APB out for photos.

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6 responses

  1. Snoring Dog Studio | Reply

    They are just getting their occupancy certificates? Oh, my gosh. The devastation is utterly remarkable and so very sad. The evidence of Sandy will be there for a long, long time, but I hope that people will be able to form new, good memories of their home place.

    1. Indeed it is. And heartbreaking. But amazingly, the pace of reconstruction is pretty remarkable as well. Hours after I left Normandy Beach, we witnessed a testament to the resilience of Jerseyans when we Sandy Caslte, the largest sandcastle in they world which sculptor Ed Jarrett made with the help of volunteers from the local area including many many school children in the months before our visit. Jarrettscastle.com

  2. painful pictures, regardless I enjoyed reading the post

    1. I know, John, and I’m not sure they’re the most painful that Diane passed on to me (I may update). Awful.

      I’m glad you enjoyed the post though. Thanks for taking the time to read and comment! Always appreciated.

  3. Yes and we are a lucky one. Our neighbors who are year round residents have yet to even start construction as their house needs to be demolished first. Luckily they have been able to find a rental in Normandy Beach so their children can live as close to home as possible. Peter thanks for remembering Normandy is such a special way!

    1. Samm was telling me some of the subsequent issues that have arisen since Sandy — Easement (a dirty word apparently in some parts), compensation, insurance, continuing homelessness. You would think somehow we’d all pull together and help each other to manage.

      I think Normandy will always have a special place in my heart, Diane.

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